Mt. Ada - Wrigley Mansion

Built by chewing gum magnate, William Wrigley, Jr., for his wife Ada between 1919 and 1921, the mansion on top of Mt. Ada served as the family's summer cottage, allowing them an escape from Chicago's cold winters.

The Georgian Colonial Revival style mansion was built by architect Zachary Taylor Davis, who also designed the Chicago Cubs' Wrigley Field. The spot atop Mt. Ada was picked as it was the first spot to receive the morning sun and the last spot to receive afternoon light before the sun dipped behind the mountains. In 1916, Wrigley purchased the Chicago Cubs with a group of investors, wholly owning the team by 1925. The Cubs held their spring training on Catalina Island from 1921-1951 (with the exception of WWII years). Wrigley Field West was positioned in a spot where Wrigley could view the team's practice from high atop Mt. Ada. He was known to watch the practice and call down to the manager to have the men run up the hill to Mt. Ada if he didn't think they were practicing hard enough. 

The home was built in an  “L” shape and wraps around a formal motor court entry on the mountain side, and a grand staircase, leading up to the mansion from the ocean side.  The home was originally designed using Ms. Wrigley's ideas, which included three stories, a Turkish bath, billiard room, organ chamber, and a refrigerator room. There were also six bedrooms, a sun room, and an elegant terrace porch. Many of these original design details were modified or removed entirely such as the third floor of the home.

The home has placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. The same year, the property was turned into a luxury bed and breakfast offering six guest suites, along with many amenities including breakfast, lunch, evening libations and a golf cart to use during your stay.